NEWS: Hotel 'plastic ban' introduced

Global hotel chain Accor is banning single-use plastics from its 340,000 hotel rooms by 2022.

The company, which operates 40 brands including Ibis and Novotel, is removing every tube of shampoo and shower gel.

It is also replacing common hotel items usually made from plastic - including keycards, laundry bags and cups - with materials made from 'relevant alternatives'.

A spokesperson said: "Today we have more than 200-million single-use plastic products per year in our rooms, meetings, restaurants and leisure areas.

"Beyond the elimination of all plastic straws, stirrers and cotton buds already engaged, our group will eliminate all guest-related single-use plastic items in our nearly 5,000 hotels in 110 countries by end 2022.

"Relevant alternatives to single-use plastics are already proposed, for some others, sourcing is in progress with the aim to ensure the same level of guest experience.

"For each solution proposed to hotels, are considering operational impact, costs and better environmental performance."


"Sustainability is very important to me and I know its importance for our future and the next generations to follow, including my little girl."


In South America the Sofitel Bogota has already removed most single-use plastics.

General Manager David Kianni said: "Sustainability is very important to me and I know its importance for our future and the next generations to follow, including my little girl.

"This said, I decided to challenge my team to become more sustainable and to go plastic free.

"Of course, supported fully by my team and my region. This is a team effort!”

Asmahane Benamara, who oversees sustainability projects at the Novotel Paris Les Halles, said: “In our hotel, offering our guests a sustainable experience is key.

"Convinced of this priority, the hotel's owner as well as our team took the removal of all single-use plastic as a priority.

"We first made an inventory of all plastic products we had in our rooms, meetings, and at our breakfast buffet and found relevant ecological alternatives.

"We received positive feedbacks from guests and now want reinforce our communication to them.”

Michael Ortiz, from the Fairmont Scottsdale Princess in North America, said the 'Fairmont’s new construction and renovation standards incorporates water filtration taps in guest rooms to reduce not just plastic but bottled water altogether'.

He added: “Our largest challenge was finding suppliers of adequate replacements.

"Often suppliers in our region have not yet answered the call to action on the scale demanded - therefore, supplies quickly ran out.

"In one instance, paper straws were supplier substituted with corn based compostable straws that upon arrival in the Arizona heat had melted together.

"This implantation challenge served to highlight the success of providing straws only upon request.


"We do not inherit the Earth from our ancestors we borrow it from our children' and we owe it to the next generation to do our every bit possible in reducing the plastic consumption in our hotels”


"The challenge of straw supply dwindling led to a deeper understanding of the reduction that was taking place and the guest satisfaction at the same time.”

Kevin Bossin, the Vice President Operations of Accor Singapore, said 'we have already removed 100 per cent of the plastic stirrers, changed takeaway boxes and cutlery to more sustainable alternatives'.

“As the saying goes 'we do not inherit the Earth from our ancestors we borrow it from our children' and we owe it to the next generation to do our every bit possible in reducing the plastic consumption in our hotels.”

An Accor spokesperson added: "Plastic is practical, it is light, it resists various elements such as water, heat, cold and can take various forms.

"The problem is that plastic is omnipresent and often used for single-use objects.

"In fact its production has increased 20-fold since the 1960s and only five per cent of this plastic is recycled worldwide, the rest is incinerated, buried or thrown into the wild.

"It is estimated that each of us ingests the equivalent of one credit card every week.

"To go even further on fighting plastic Accor has committed to join the Global Tourism Plastics Initiative led by the United Nations Environment Programme and the World Tourism Organisation, in collaboration with the Ellen MacArthur Foundation.

"This movement draws a line in the sand in the fight against plastic waste and pollution. Governments and businesses, such as Accor, commit to a set of ambitious targets.

"We will work together to eliminate the plastic items we don’t need; innovate so all plastics we do need are designed to be safely reused, recycled, or composted; and circulate everything we use to keep it in the economy and out of the environment."


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